Archive for the ‘Photography’ Category

Panorama Tour for St Matthew’s Church

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017

St Matthews Church naveI’ve just completed a 360° panoramic tour of St Matthew’s Church, Winchester. The church is quite small so only needs four views: Nave, Chancel, Vestry and Gallery. The earliest parts of the church date to about 1200, but like so many English churches it probably stands on the site of an earlier Saxon building. The church has recently been lovingly restored and is certainly worth a visit.

The photos were stitched using PTGui and the tour was made using the latest version of Pano2VR, which I must say is a joy to use. The old version was good, but the new version offers so many more features.

Open Studio and Red Cross Exhibition

Monday, June 5th, 2017

As part of the Cornwall Open Studio scheme Paul Jackson, an old friend of mine, asked me if I’d show some of my photographs alongside his pots. The last day of the show coincided with opening their garden to the public to raise money for the Red Cross of which Rosie (Paul’s wife) is president of the Cornish branch. The weather started out damp and grey, but by the time the garden opened the sun came out and they had over 200 visitors, raising nearly £2,000.

The photographs were all panoramas of the North Cornish Coast and Bodmin Moor. Here they are on show.

Click to see the individual images.

Paul's Studio
Some of these prints are now available for sale through this website.

Ghostsigns of Clapham

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2017

Ghostsigns are the old advertisments that were painted directly onto the brick on the sides of buildings. They are gradually fading away, although occasionally a new one is revealed when a modern poster site is removed for maintenance. Clapham is one of the best areas of London to see them.

Click on the photos to see them larger.

You can find out more about ghostsigns at the Ghostsigns website and at Painted Signs and Mosaics. and see more of my photos of them on Flickr.

Edit – 26/04/2017: I recently noticed two ghostsigns I hadn’t seen before on Lavender Hill. I’ve added them to the gallery. One is easily readable, but I can’t make out anything at all on the last one, although you can see that once there were six separate panels.

Also, the TV, Audio, Video Repair sign has been painted over and is gone for good.

Mawgan Porth out of Season

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

During the summer Mawgan Porth on Cornwall’s north coast is full of people, due in no small part to its sandy, family friendly beach. But it was looking very empty and sorry for itself when I went there yesterday.

Click on the photos to see them larger.

A Walk Along The Thames

Friday, December 16th, 2016

Here’s a few photos from a walk along the south bank of the Thames last night from London Bridge to Waterloo.

Click on the photos to see them larger.

The Chagall Windows at All Saints’ Church, Tudeley

Friday, November 18th, 2016

All Saints’ Church at Tudeley in Kent is famous worldwide for its stained glass windows by Russian artist Marc Chagall. The first of these was made in 1967 to commemorate the death of Sarah d’Avigdor-Goldsmid who drowned at the age of 21. When Chagall arrived for the installation of the east window and saw the church, he said, “It’s magnificent. I will do them all.” The last window was installed in 1985, the year of his death.

The windows are inspired by the words of Psalm 8, 4-8:

What is man that Thou art mindful of him, and the son of man that Thou dost visit him?
For Thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honor.
Thou hast made him to have dominion over the works of Thy hands; Thou hast put all things under his feet,
all sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field,
the fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.

Click on the photos to see them larger.

The windows in the chancel and north aisle are of an intense blue and contrast greatly with the two large yellow windows which suffuse the nave in gold.

Panorama of Tudely Church chancelYou can see a 360° panorama tour of the interior of the church by clicking here.

The Yeo Sisters

Friday, August 26th, 2016

While I was photographing some more 360° panoramas for my ongoing series on the parish churches of Cornwall I came across this really touching memorial to three sisters of the Yeo family who all died young in the 1630s.

I’ve written out the full text below keeping the original spelling (errors and all), including the long s.

Click on the photos to see them larger.

Here lyeth the body of An Yeo who was buried on the 26 day of June Anno Domini 1633 being of the age of 14 years.

Here lyeth allso the body of Susanna Yeo who was buried on the 10 day of January Ano Dom 1634 being of the age of 20 years.

Here lyeth allso the body of Margreat Yeo who was buried on the 19 day of May Ano Dom 1638 being of the age of 20 years all which were the daughters of Edmond Yeo of this prſh eſq & Elizabeth his wife.

SUSANA MARGERET AN

Here ly entombed 3 ſiſters all ſweet girles
For graces rare for goodnes matchles perles
The youngeſt firſt did make up her account
And did ascend gods sion holy mount
The eldeſt not willing here to ſtay
went on with cheere thy hard but happy way
The ſecond laſt on cherub wings did fly
Unto the place of ioy the ſtarrie ſkie
Theire ſoules are mett theire bodies ſleepe in dust
And ſhall not wake till riſe againe the iuſt
when in the aire they ſhall theire iesus ſee
And with a com ye bleſſed bleſſed be

Easter Rising

Sunday, March 27th, 2016

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Easter Rising, here’s a photo of some graffiti on the General Post Office in Dublin on the 60th anniversary in 1976: Freedom Fighters Are Not Criminals.

Freedom Fighters Are Not Criminals

Click on the image to see it larger.

Cornish Churches

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015

St Columb Minor

I’ve just updated six of the 360° panoramas from my series of Cornish Parish Churches. The original panoramas were some of the first ones I ever made and although I thought they were quite good at the time I’d become increasingly dissatisfied with them. The ones I’ve replaced are St Ervan, St Mawgan, St Columb Major, St Columb Minor, St Wenn and Withiel.

St Columb Major

I was very lucky at St Columb Major that the church warden was there as the rood screen entrance to the chancel is normally locked, but she was more than happy to let me in. The chancel roof is a particularly fine example of Victorian restoration.

Withiel

Ravilious and The Cerne Abbas Giant

Monday, July 13th, 2015

I’ve now been twice to see the Eric Ravilious exhibition at the Dulwich Picture Gallery. I love his work, particularly the watercolours of the chalk downland and chalk hill figures. But I find his depiction of the Cerne Abbas Giant extremely puzzling. The giant is painted brown, rather than gleaming chalk white.

Revilious, Cerne Abbas Giant

It was painted in 1939 and some people have said that the figure was camouflaged to prevent German pilots using it as a landmark. But I thought that the hill figures weren’t covered over until early in 1940. In fact the exhibition catalogue states: “The following year [i.e. 1940 – the year after the painting was made] saw a mass turfing-over of chalk figures, to prevent enemy airmen using them as landmarks.” Despite searching for ages I can’t find any specific reference online that says exactly when the the Giant was camouflaged.

I’ve retouched a version of the painting to see what it would have looked like with the figure in white. Much as I like Ravilious’s painting, I think I would have preferred to see it this way.

Revilious, Cerne Abbas Giant in white

Click on the images to see them larger and to fade from one to the other.

Also interesting is how much Ravilious has changed the vertical scale of the hillside in order to give a clearer view of the Giant. Compare with this photograph which I took in 2012 from much the same position.

Cerne Abbas Giant