Posts Tagged ‘architecture’

St Peter’s Church, Hascombe

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017

St Peter’s Church, at Hascombe in Surrey was described by Betjeman as ‘a Tractarian Work of Art’. Built on a site of Saxon origins, by 1862 the medieval church which was then over 600 years old had become so dilapidated that rebuilding was considered the only option. Led by the Rector, Canon Musgrave, Henry Woodyer (a pupil of Butterfield) was commissioned to design a new church. The simple plan of nave and apsoidal chancel became a canvas for a richly decorated interior. The walls of the nave are painted with the 153 fishes of the second miraculous catch of fish, all tangled in a net which is being dragged in by seven of the disciples. Above the chancel arch is Christ in Majesty flanked by the 12 apostles. The rood screen (a survivor from the previous church) was restored and repainted.

Hascombe Rood Screen and Chancel Arch

The chancel is decorated with a riot of angels. Surrounding the reredos are the saints of the nineteen churches of the Rural Deanery. In the windows and splays are scenes in the life of Christ. The central window shows the Crucifixion. In the spandrils are stories from the Old Testament from the expulsion of Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden to the Archangel Gabriel appearing to Zaccharias.

Hascombe Chancel

You can see a 360° panoramic tour of the church by following this link.

Morwenstow and Kilkhampton Churches

Thursday, January 8th, 2015

Earlier this week I drove up to the very north of Cornwall to photograph and make 360° panoramas of the churches at Morwenstow and Kilkhampton. They have some of the earliest features still to be seen on any Cornish church, both having Norman arches to the south door. In the case of Morwenstow a second Norman arch (reused from another church) was added when the porch was built, probably in the 15th century. Three bays of the north aisle also have Norman arches with zig-zag moulding.

Morwenstow Church

From 1834 to 1875 Morwenstow was the parish of the Reverend Robert S Hawker who wrote what has become known as the Cornish Anthem, ‘The Song of the Western Men’ (also known as ‘Trelawny’).

The Song of the Western Men

A good sword and a trusty hand!
A merry heart and true!
King James’s men shall understand
What Cornish lads can do!

And have they fixed the where and when?
And shall Trelawny die?
Here’s twenty thousand Cornish men
Will know the reason why!

Out spake their Captain brave and bold:
A merry wight was he:-
“If London Tower was Michael’s hold,
We’d set Trelawny free!

“We’ll cross the Tamar, land to land:
The Severn is no stay:
With ‘one and all,’ and hand in hand;
And who shall bid us nay?

“And when we come to London Wall,
A pleasant sight to view,
Come forth! come forth! ye cowards all:
Here’s men as good as you.

“Trelawny he’s in keep and hold:
Trelawny he may die:
But here’s twenty thousand Cornish bold
Will know the reason why!”

Kilkhampton Church

Kilkhampton has a great collection of over 150 bench ends with religious or heraldic imagery. Many of these date from about 1380, but some that were in a bad state of repair were replaced with copies in the 1860s.

All Saints Church, Margaret Street

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

About 100 yards north of Oxford Street in London lies one of the best examples of Victorian Gothic architecture you’ll ever see. It would be easy to miss this church, even though it has one of the highest spires of any church in London. If you don’t look up and see the spire when you stand outside, you could walk straight past. All Saints church is set back from Margaret Street in a small courtyard. Once inside, a world of beauty opens before you.

All Saints interior

It was designed by architect William Butterfield in 1850 and completed by 1859. Inside, the walls are covered in spectacular tiled murals. Designed by Butterfield, they were painted by Alexander Gibbs and manufactured by Henry Poole and Sons. The floor tiles are a bold geometric design by Minton. The chancel vault is a deep blue field of stars and the reredos by William Dyce (later copied and replaced by Ninian Comper in the early 1900s when the original had became blackened by the London air) depicts the life of Christ ending at the vault with Christ in Majesty.

If you seek a few moments of peace from the hustle and bustle of London you should seek out All Saints and step inside.

You can see a 360° panorama tour of the church in the main part of my website.

Update – 1/11/2013: All Saints Margaret Street have added the 360° panorama tour to their website.

Highpoint 1

Sunday, November 11th, 2012

As promised here are a few more of my photos from the ‘Thirties’ exhibition at the Hayward Gallery in 1979. These are of Highpoint 1, designed by architect Berthold Lubetkin and engineered by Ove Arup in 1935. One of the best examples of the International Style, the building was admired by Le Corbusier when he visited London.

St Olaf House

Monday, July 9th, 2012

Back in 1979 I had the good luck to photograph a series of buildings for the ‘Thirties’ exhibition at the Hayward Gallery. The photos were used in the exhibition in a series of slide programmes with 2m square screens and featured several landmark buildings from the 1930s. One of my favourites was St Olaf House, the head office of Hay’s Wharf, situated on the Thames between London and Tower Bridges. St Olaf House was designed by architect Harry Goodhart-Rendel, right down to the details such as the door handles, clocks and carpets. One thing he didn’t design were the bas relief sculptures on the river frontage for which he commissioned his friend Frank Dobson.

I’ve spent this afternoon scanning some of the original photos which were shot on 120 Ektachrome film on a Hasselblad.

When I get time I’ll scan some photos of the other buildings, which included Highpoint 1, the Penguin Pool at London Zoo and Dudley Zoo (Berthold Lubetkin) and some of the stations on the 30s extension to the Piccadilly line (Charles Holden).