Posts Tagged ‘stained glass’

The Chagall Windows at All Saints’ Church, Tudeley

Friday, November 18th, 2016

All Saints’ Church at Tudeley in Kent is famous worldwide for its stained glass windows by Russian artist Marc Chagall. The first of these was made in 1967 to commemorate the death of Sarah d’Avigdor-Goldsmid who drowned at the age of 21. When Chagall arrived for the installation of the east window and saw the church, he said, “It’s magnificent. I will do them all.” The last window was installed in 1985, the year of his death.

The windows are inspired by the words of Psalm 8, 4-8:

What is man that Thou art mindful of him, and the son of man that Thou dost visit him?
For Thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honor.
Thou hast made him to have dominion over the works of Thy hands; Thou hast put all things under his feet,
all sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field,
the fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.

Click on the photos to see them larger.

The windows in the chancel and north aisle are of an intense blue and contrast greatly with the two large yellow windows which suffuse the nave in gold.

Panorama of Tudely Church chancelYou can see a 360° panorama tour of the interior of the church by clicking here.

Medieval Galleries at the V&A

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

Mitre - possibly belonging to Thomas BecketA couple of days ago I went to the Victoria and Albert Museum to see the medieval galleries. Many years ago I photographed some of the objects in the collection for a wide-screen audio visual programme at the English Romanesque Art 1066-1200 exhibition at the Hayward Gallery in 1984. This included the mitre which is thought to have belonged to Thomas Becket. Being allowed to handle that was a real thrill. The programme mainly depicted the architecture of the period, and I spent many days photographing some of the best Romanesque buildings in the country, including Durham cathedral where we were given a key and told “This key opens any door in the building – make yourselves at home”.

The galleries have been improved immensely since those days and the objects are now beautifully displayed. Here are some of my favourites.

(Click on the photos to see them larger.)