Posts Tagged ‘photography’

The Yeo Sisters

Friday, August 26th, 2016

While I was photographing some more 360° panoramas for my ongoing series on the parish churches of Cornwall I came across this really touching memorial to three sisters of the Yeo family who all died young in the 1630s.

I’ve written out the full text below keeping the original spelling (errors and all), including the long s.

Click on the photos to see them larger.

Here lyeth the body of An Yeo who was buried on the 26 day of June Anno Domini 1633 being of the age of 14 years.

Here lyeth allso the body of Susanna Yeo who was buried on the 10 day of January Ano Dom 1634 being of the age of 20 years.

Here lyeth allso the body of Margreat Yeo who was buried on the 19 day of May Ano Dom 1638 being of the age of 20 years all which were the daughters of Edmond Yeo of this prſh eſq & Elizabeth his wife.

SUSANA MARGERET AN

Here ly entombed 3 ſiſters all ſweet girles
For graces rare for goodnes matchles perles
The youngeſt firſt did make up her account
And did ascend gods sion holy mount
The eldeſt not willing here to ſtay
went on with cheere thy hard but happy way
The ſecond laſt on cherub wings did fly
Unto the place of ioy the ſtarrie ſkie
Theire ſoules are mett theire bodies ſleepe in dust
And ſhall not wake till riſe againe the iuſt
when in the aire they ſhall theire iesus ſee
And with a com ye bleſſed bleſſed be

Easter Rising

Sunday, March 27th, 2016

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Easter Rising, here’s a photo of some graffiti on the General Post Office in Dublin on the 60th anniversary in 1976: Freedom Fighters Are Not Criminals.

Freedom Fighters Are Not Criminals

Click on the image to see it larger.

Cornish Churches

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015

St Columb Minor

I’ve just updated six of the 360° panoramas from my series of Cornish Parish Churches. The original panoramas were some of the first ones I ever made and although I thought they were quite good at the time I’d become increasingly dissatisfied with them. The ones I’ve replaced are St Ervan, St Mawgan, St Columb Major, St Columb Minor, St Wenn and Withiel.

St Columb Major

I was very lucky at St Columb Major that the church warden was there as the rood screen entrance to the chancel is normally locked, but she was more than happy to let me in. The chancel roof is a particularly fine example of Victorian restoration.

Withiel

Lloyds TSB Bank Lobby

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

The lobby of the Lloyds TSB Bank at 222 Strand, London is a wonderful display of art nouveau tiling by Doulton painted by J H McLennan. Formerly a restaurant and built originally as the Palsgrove Hotel, this is the work of the architect G Cuthbert, and dates from 1883.

(Click on the photos to see them larger.)

A Walk Along the Regent’s Canal (part 2)

Monday, February 23rd, 2015

Last weekend I completed my walk along the Regent’s Canal starting at the Islington Tunnel and going to where it meets the Thames at the Limehouse Basin.

(Click on the photos to see them larger.)

After the walk along the canal I met up with some friends and went for a meal at the Cutty Sark pub and restaurant in Greenwich where there was a spectacular sunset.

Sunset panorama from Greenwich

Part one of the walk…

The Padstow ‘Obby ‘Oss

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

The Blue Ribbon 'OssNo one knows when the ‘Obby ‘Oss festival, which takes place on the 1st of May (or the 2nd if the 1st is on a Sunday) every year in Padstow, Cornwall, started. The earliest written reference to it is in about 1800, but it’s likely that the festival dates back to much earlier times and is probably related to Celtic Spring rituals.

The celebrations start at midnight the night before when the Night Song is sung to the landlord of the Golden Lion Inn. The next morning, with the town decorated with branches of green leaves, bluebells and cowslips, the children’s parade, with smaller sized, colt ‘Osses, starts at about 8.00am. The Day Song is accompanied by drums and accordions.

Unite and unite and let us all unite,
For summer is a come unto day,
And whither we are going we will all unite,
In the merry morning of May.

Since the end of the First World War there have been two ‘Osses, the Old (Red) ‘Oss and the Armistice or Peace ‘Oss which took on the Blue Ribbon. The Blue ‘Oss starts its parade at 10.00 followed at 11.00 by the Old ‘Oss. The two ‘Osses tour around the town, seldom meeting, led by the MC with his top hat and decorated cane, then the accordions and drums, followed by the Teaser and the ‘Oss, and the rest of the ‘Mayers’. The tour climbs the hill out of Padstow via the church to Prideaux Place where the Red ‘Oss dances outside the house. Later the Blue ‘Oss visits the house and is invited in.

The white clothing (which should only be worn by true Padstonians) is decorated with neckerchiefs of red or blue. The ‘Oss is made from a large circular hoop covered with black sailcloth that falls to the ground. The man carrying the ‘Oss wears a tall, fearsome, conical mask. At various points in the parade the ‘Oss ‘dies’ and the relentless beat of the drums stops while a mournful chorus is sung.

O! where is St. George,
O!, where is he O,
He is out in his long boat on the salt sea O.
Up flies the kite and down tails the lark O.
Aunt Ursula Birdhood she had an old ewe
And she died in her own Park O.

The ‘Oss is then ‘reborn’ to the cry of ‘Oss ‘Oss, Wee ‘Oss! and the drums and parade carry on.

As it begins to get dark, the two ‘Osses eventually meet in the town square and dance around the maypole, after which they are returned to their stables. The supporters then meet again at the maypole to carry on singing until midnight.

(Click on the photos to see them larger.)

Me having a beerThese photos were taken 40 years ago at the May Day celebrations in 1975. I arrived from Trebetherick where I was staying with friends at about 8.00 in the morning having caught the Black Tor Ferry across the Camel estuary from Rock and I stayed all day until well into the evening. I don’t remember how I got back to Trebetherick that night – possibly one or two beers had been drunk.

You can see more photos from the day in my collection at Flickr.

Thanks to John Buckingham of the Padstow Museum for help with the facts.

Morwenstow and Kilkhampton Churches

Thursday, January 8th, 2015

Earlier this week I drove up to the very north of Cornwall to photograph and make 360° panoramas of the churches at Morwenstow and Kilkhampton. They have some of the earliest features still to be seen on any Cornish church, both having Norman arches to the south door. In the case of Morwenstow a second Norman arch (reused from another church) was added when the porch was built, probably in the 15th century. Three bays of the north aisle also have Norman arches with zig-zag moulding.

Morwenstow Church

From 1834 to 1875 Morwenstow was the parish of the Reverend Robert S Hawker who wrote what has become known as the Cornish Anthem, ‘The Song of the Western Men’ (also known as ‘Trelawny’).

The Song of the Western Men

A good sword and a trusty hand!
A merry heart and true!
King James’s men shall understand
What Cornish lads can do!

And have they fixed the where and when?
And shall Trelawny die?
Here’s twenty thousand Cornish men
Will know the reason why!

Out spake their Captain brave and bold:
A merry wight was he:-
“If London Tower was Michael’s hold,
We’d set Trelawny free!

“We’ll cross the Tamar, land to land:
The Severn is no stay:
With ‘one and all,’ and hand in hand;
And who shall bid us nay?

“And when we come to London Wall,
A pleasant sight to view,
Come forth! come forth! ye cowards all:
Here’s men as good as you.

“Trelawny he’s in keep and hold:
Trelawny he may die:
But here’s twenty thousand Cornish bold
Will know the reason why!”

Kilkhampton Church

Kilkhampton has a great collection of over 150 bench ends with religious or heraldic imagery. Many of these date from about 1380, but some that were in a bad state of repair were replaced with copies in the 1860s.

Ghostsigns Calendar

Thursday, November 28th, 2013

I’ve just found out that I’ve had one of my photos accepted for the 2014 Ghostsigns Calendar. Very chuffed! Mind you, I only just made it in 12th place.

Chaudronnerie

In case you’re wondering a chaudronnerie and a serrurerie is a boilermaker and a locksmith, selling new and used boilers, stills and piping.

All Saints Church, Margaret Street

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

About 100 yards north of Oxford Street in London lies one of the best examples of Victorian Gothic architecture you’ll ever see. It would be easy to miss this church, even though it has one of the highest spires of any church in London. If you don’t look up and see the spire when you stand outside, you could walk straight past. All Saints church is set back from Margaret Street in a small courtyard. Once inside, a world of beauty opens before you.

All Saints interior

It was designed by architect William Butterfield in 1850 and completed by 1859. Inside, the walls are covered in spectacular tiled murals. Designed by Butterfield, they were painted by Alexander Gibbs and manufactured by Henry Poole and Sons. The floor tiles are a bold geometric design by Minton. The chancel vault is a deep blue field of stars and the reredos by William Dyce (later copied and replaced by Ninian Comper in the early 1900s when the original had became blackened by the London air) depicts the life of Christ ending at the vault with Christ in Majesty.

If you seek a few moments of peace from the hustle and bustle of London you should seek out All Saints and step inside.

You can see a 360° panorama tour of the church in the main part of my website.

Update – 1/11/2013: All Saints Margaret Street have added the 360° panorama tour to their website.

Photos on ‘Daybreak’

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

ITV’s ‘Daybreak’ featured some of my photos of the church of St Magnus the Martyr this morning. They had a short item on the local London news section mentioning the 60th birthday of the National Churches Trust. They’ve created a new website – The UK’s Favourite Churches – to mark the occasion.  Boris Johnson has named St Magnus as his favourite church in London.

St Magnus the Martyr Church

No payment of course, but at least I got an on-screen credit.