Posts Tagged ‘Cornwall’

Mawgan Porth out of Season

Thursday, January 12th, 2017

During the summer Mawgan Porth on Cornwall’s north coast is full of people, due in no small part to its sandy, family friendly beach. But it was looking very empty and sorry for itself when I went there yesterday.

Click on the photos to see them larger.

The Yeo Sisters

Friday, August 26th, 2016

While I was photographing some more 360° panoramas for my ongoing series on the parish churches of Cornwall I came across this really touching memorial to three sisters of the Yeo family who all died young in the 1630s.

I’ve written out the full text below keeping the original spelling (errors and all), including the long s.

Click on the photos to see them larger.

Here lyeth the body of An Yeo who was buried on the 26 day of June Anno Domini 1633 being of the age of 14 years.

Here lyeth allso the body of Susanna Yeo who was buried on the 10 day of January Ano Dom 1634 being of the age of 20 years.

Here lyeth allso the body of Margreat Yeo who was buried on the 19 day of May Ano Dom 1638 being of the age of 20 years all which were the daughters of Edmond Yeo of this prſh eſq & Elizabeth his wife.

SUSANA MARGERET AN

Here ly entombed 3 ſiſters all ſweet girles
For graces rare for goodnes matchles perles
The youngeſt firſt did make up her account
And did ascend gods sion holy mount
The eldeſt not willing here to ſtay
went on with cheere thy hard but happy way
The ſecond laſt on cherub wings did fly
Unto the place of ioy the ſtarrie ſkie
Theire ſoules are mett theire bodies ſleepe in dust
And ſhall not wake till riſe againe the iuſt
when in the aire they ſhall theire iesus ſee
And with a com ye bleſſed bleſſed be

Cornish Churches

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015

St Columb Minor

I’ve just updated six of the 360° panoramas from my series of Cornish Parish Churches. The original panoramas were some of the first ones I ever made and although I thought they were quite good at the time I’d become increasingly dissatisfied with them. The ones I’ve replaced are St Ervan, St Mawgan, St Columb Major, St Columb Minor, St Wenn and Withiel.

St Columb Major

I was very lucky at St Columb Major that the church warden was there as the rood screen entrance to the chancel is normally locked, but she was more than happy to let me in. The chancel roof is a particularly fine example of Victorian restoration.

Withiel

The Padstow ‘Obby ‘Oss

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

The Blue Ribbon 'OssNo one knows when the ‘Obby ‘Oss festival, which takes place on the 1st of May (or the 2nd if the 1st is on a Sunday) every year in Padstow, Cornwall, started. The earliest written reference to it is in about 1800, but it’s likely that the festival dates back to much earlier times and is probably related to Celtic Spring rituals.

The celebrations start at midnight the night before when the Night Song is sung to the landlord of the Golden Lion Inn. The next morning, with the town decorated with branches of green leaves, bluebells and cowslips, the children’s parade, with smaller sized, colt ‘Osses, starts at about 8.00am. The Day Song is accompanied by drums and accordions.

Unite and unite and let us all unite,
For summer is a come unto day,
And whither we are going we will all unite,
In the merry morning of May.

Since the end of the First World War there have been two ‘Osses, the Old (Red) ‘Oss and the Armistice or Peace ‘Oss which took on the Blue Ribbon. The Blue ‘Oss starts its parade at 10.00 followed at 11.00 by the Old ‘Oss. The two ‘Osses tour around the town, seldom meeting, led by the MC with his top hat and decorated cane, then the accordions and drums, followed by the Teaser and the ‘Oss, and the rest of the ‘Mayers’. The tour climbs the hill out of Padstow via the church to Prideaux Place where the Red ‘Oss dances outside the house. Later the Blue ‘Oss visits the house and is invited in.

The white clothing (which should only be worn by true Padstonians) is decorated with neckerchiefs of red or blue. The ‘Oss is made from a large circular hoop covered with black sailcloth that falls to the ground. The man carrying the ‘Oss wears a tall, fearsome, conical mask. At various points in the parade the ‘Oss ‘dies’ and the relentless beat of the drums stops while a mournful chorus is sung.

O! where is St. George,
O!, where is he O,
He is out in his long boat on the salt sea O.
Up flies the kite and down tails the lark O.
Aunt Ursula Birdhood she had an old ewe
And she died in her own Park O.

The ‘Oss is then ‘reborn’ to the cry of ‘Oss ‘Oss, Wee ‘Oss! and the drums and parade carry on.

As it begins to get dark, the two ‘Osses eventually meet in the town square and dance around the maypole, after which they are returned to their stables. The supporters then meet again at the maypole to carry on singing until midnight.

(Click on the photos to see them larger.)

Me having a beerThese photos were taken 40 years ago at the May Day celebrations in 1975. I arrived from Trebetherick where I was staying with friends at about 8.00 in the morning having caught the Black Tor Ferry across the Camel estuary from Rock and I stayed all day until well into the evening. I don’t remember how I got back to Trebetherick that night – possibly one or two beers had been drunk.

You can see more photos from the day in my collection at Flickr.

Thanks to John Buckingham of the Padstow Museum for help with the facts.

Polzeath Panorama

Monday, October 6th, 2014

Two days ago I went to Polzeath to take some panoramic photos. My main objective was to create a wide image to make into a large print (I still haven’t processed all of the photos yet and only done a couple of test stitches) but while I was there I made a 360° panorama for my website.

Polzeath

Very stupidly I totally forgot to shoot one section of the panorama, but I managed to repair this by using two of the photos I’d taken for one of the print shots. If you know where to look you can just see where the patch is, but I’m still quite pleased with the result. In my defence, I was in a position on the edge of a 10 metre drop where I couldn’t walk round the tripod as I panned the camera, but even so it was a silly mistake and I was lucky to be able to salvage the image.

Bench Ends in St Winnow Church

Thursday, March 20th, 2014

St Winnow ChurchA couple of days ago I was doing some more panoramic photography in my ongoing series of Cornish churches. In St Winnow church, which stands on the bank of the River Fowey, are some really nice medieval carved bench ends. The best two were of a ship in a storm and a drunken man wearing a Cornish kilt. In the ship in a storm you can see a demon in the sky with his cheeks puffed out blowing up the storm while four men cower in the boat. And the drunken man is swigging what is presumably cider from the bottle.

It’s well worth the mile long drive down what’s not much more than a track to see this church. There’s also a fine carved pulpit dating from about 1600 and a rood screen, restored in 1907, with carving by Violet Pinwill.

Storm Over Constantine Bay

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

I went to Constantine Bay yesterday morning and in between the heavy showers and gusting winds I managed to take a few nice photos. I was particularly pleased with this one – and yes, I thought it would work well in black & white as I was taking it.

Storm Over Constantine Bay

Click on the photo to see some more of the photos on my Flickr feed.

Cornish Church Panoramas

Thursday, January 24th, 2013

In the last few days I’ve added some new 360° panoramas of some Cornish Churches, namely Ladock, Crantock, Lanlivery and Luxulyan. They all had some amazing features: the altar painting at Ladock, the font, rood screen and wood carving at Crantock, the bellringers’ painted sign and ceiling bosses at Lanlivery and the font and memorials at Luxulyan.

You can see more photos of Cornish Churches at my Flickr pages.

Rock Oyster Festival

Saturday, June 19th, 2010

Had a great day at the Rock Oyster Festival today. Loads of good food and drink – including Stingers a very pleasant cordial made from nettles and a great mackerel burger from Nathan Outlaw.

I flew my Crane Rokkaku with the Carp streamers and was surprised to see a large white inflatable angel kite appear from behind me and even more surprised to see it being flown by Martin Lester – I’d forgotten that he’d moved to Cornwall from Bristol some years ago.

Porthilly Gallery

Wednesday, May 26th, 2010

Porthilly GalleryOne of my oldest friend’s son, Jethro Jackson, has just opened a studio/gallery at Porthilly, near Rock, on the North Cornwall Coast. Jethro and his father, Paul Jackson are both potters and more recently Jethro has started painting beautiful seascapes. The gallery is also showing the work of other potters including Chris Prindl and Eddie Curtis, sculpture and jewellery – and some of my photographs! This is the first time in nearly 20 years that any of my photos have been seen in public. Most of the photos are of Cornwall, either the North Coast or Bodmin Moor.

Padstow Bay and Stepper Point

You can see some of the images in my Cornwall collections at Flickr and animated versions of the panoramas here.

Porthilly Gallery Interior

The gallery is very light and airy and you can see Jethro at work in his studio at the rear.

About 100 metres down the road is the beautiful little church of St Michael which stands right on the coast at Porthilly Cove with views of Padstow across the Camel Estuary. It’s a fantastic spot and well worth a visit if you’re in Cornwall this summer.