Archive for the ‘Panorama’ Category

St Peter’s Church, Hascombe

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017

St Peter’s Church, at Hascombe in Surrey was described by Betjeman as ‘a Tractarian Work of Art’. Built on a site of Saxon origins, by 1862 the medieval church which was then over 600 years old had become so dilapidated that rebuilding was considered the only option. Led by the Rector, Canon Musgrave, Henry Woodyer (a pupil of Butterfield) was commissioned to design a new church. The simple plan of nave and apsoidal chancel became a canvas for a richly decorated interior. The walls of the nave are painted with the 153 fishes of the second miraculous catch of fish, all tangled in a net which is being dragged in by seven of the disciples. Above the chancel arch is Christ in Majesty flanked by the 12 apostles. The rood screen (a survivor from the previous church) was restored and repainted.

Hascombe Rood Screen and Chancel Arch

The chancel is decorated with a riot of angels. Surrounding the reredos are the saints of the nineteen churches of the Rural Deanery. In the windows and splays are scenes in the life of Christ. The central window shows the Crucifixion. In the spandrils are stories from the Old Testament from the expulsion of Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden to the Archangel Gabriel appearing to Zaccharias.

Hascombe Chancel

You can see a 360° panoramic tour of the church by following this link.

Panorama Tour for St Matthew’s Church

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017

St Matthews Church naveI’ve just completed a 360° panoramic tour of St Matthew’s Church, Winchester. The church is quite small so only needs four views: Nave, Chancel, Vestry and Gallery. The earliest parts of the church date to about 1200, but like so many English churches it probably stands on the site of an earlier Saxon building. The church has recently been lovingly restored and is certainly worth a visit.

The photos were stitched using PTGui and the tour was made using the latest version of Pano2VR, which I must say is a joy to use. The old version was good, but the new version offers so many more features.

The Chagall Windows at All Saints’ Church, Tudeley

Friday, November 18th, 2016

All Saints’ Church at Tudeley in Kent is famous worldwide for its stained glass windows by Russian artist Marc Chagall. The first of these was made in 1967 to commemorate the death of Sarah d’Avigdor-Goldsmid who drowned at the age of 21. When Chagall arrived for the installation of the east window and saw the church, he said, “It’s magnificent. I will do them all.” The last window was installed in 1985, the year of his death.

The windows are inspired by the words of Psalm 8, 4-8:

What is man that Thou art mindful of him, and the son of man that Thou dost visit him?
For Thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honor.
Thou hast made him to have dominion over the works of Thy hands; Thou hast put all things under his feet,
all sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field,
the fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.

Click on the photos to see them larger.

The windows in the chancel and north aisle are of an intense blue and contrast greatly with the two large yellow windows which suffuse the nave in gold.

Panorama of Tudely Church chancelYou can see a 360° panorama tour of the interior of the church by clicking here.

St George at St Botolph’s Church, Hardham

Saturday, April 23rd, 2016

Possibly the earliest depiction of St George in England is in the wall paintings at St Botolph’s Church, Hardham in West Sussex which date from the 12th century. Unusually, these paintings don’t show St George and the Dragon, (unless it was once in the space now taken up by the later window in the east wall of the nave). Those that do exist are of St George at the Battle of AntiochSt George before Datian (Diocletian) and St George on the Wheel.

St George before Datian is now partly obscured by the more recent doorway, but the other two murals remain clear.

St George at the Battle of Antioch

St George at the Battle of Antioch is the first of the lower tier of paintings on the north nave wall. The saint is shown mounted upon a large white horse which he is reining in with his left hand, while with the right he has impaled a knight with his lance. There are traces of a group of armed figures at which the saint is riding, but unfortunately this part of the painting is very obscure. The lance bears at the reverse end a white four-tailed pennon, similar to those in the Bayeux Tapestry.

St George on the Wheel

The other panel depicts the martyrdom of St George on the Wheel. His halo is more visible here than in the ‘Antioch’ panel. The legend relates how that, after enduring other cruel tortures for eight days the saint was bound to a wheel of swords but the wheel was broken by two angels who descended from heaven. George was executed by decapitation before Nicodemia’s city wall, on 23 April 303.

A full 360° panorama tour of the interior of the church showing all of the murals can be seen here.